“QUEERCORE: HOW TO PUNK A REVOLUTION”— Creating a Revolution

 “QUEERCORE: HOW TO PUNK A REVOLUTION” Creating a Revolution Amos Lassen Yony Leyser’s documentary ”Queercore” looks at queer anarchy of the early days of homocore to the queercore’s Pansy Division opening for Green Day and Nirvana. It shares first-person histories including those of Bruce LaBruce, Fifth Column’s G.B. Jones, John Waters, Tribe 8’s Lynn Breedlove, Peaches, and Genesis’ Breyer P-Orridge along with DIY animation, experimental films, and zine cutups. 
We meet a queer generation of artists who revolted against the hetero and homo mainstreams. Queercore came into being as a result of when the community that one need’s is not the community that exists. Through fan zines that and queer punk revolutionaries, through circulating and making subversive movies, the fabricated community becomes real and spreads everywhere. In the 1980s, Queercore was a pseudo-movement meant to punk the punk scene as artists used radical queer identity to push back against gay assimilation and homophobic punk culture. Those interviewed here share their thoughts on homophobia, gender, feminism, AIDS, assimilation, sex, and, of course, art revealing the perspectives and experiences of bands, moviemakers, writers, and other outsiders as a community that is so badly needed is created.
The film argues that Toronto’s laughably lame first-wave punk scene laid the groundwork for a continent-wide revolution. A small group of Centre of the Universe “protoscenesters” (including long-time underground filmmaker Bruce LaBruce) blazed the way for some of the most iconic bands to ever come out of the American underground. 
We also see how, through fanzines and films, LaBruce and fellow malcontent GB Jones invented and propagated the idea that the Toronto punk scene contained a radical queer splinter faction. And that the manifestos spread by that group eventually led to riot grrrl and grunge, not to mention balls-out, tits-in-your-face torchbearers like Tribe 8 and Extra Fancy. Toronto’s first-wave punk scene actually has a legacy that goes beyond cartoon also-rans like the Viletones and Diodes.

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