“Under My Window” by Michal Ronnen Safdie— Jerusalem From a Window

Safdie, Michal. “Under My Window”, with an introduction by Ari Shavit, Powerhouse Books, 2018.

Jerusalem From a Window

Amos Lassen

Jerusalem is a city where Jews, Muslims, Christians, believers, nonbelievers, residents, tourists, and so many others have come for millennia. It is one of the world’s greatest crossroads and is host to the diversity of humanity. Michal Ronnen Safdie’s home is on a hill in the Old City of Jerusalem, along the border between the Jewish and Muslim Quarters. To the East, it overlooks the Western Wall, the Dome of the Rock, and the Al-Aqsa Mosque. To the north is the Muslim Quarter with Mount Scopus in the skyline and to the west is the Church of the Holy Sepulcher and the Christian Quarter.

Directly under her window is a narrow alley that is a passageway for thousands of people every day. It is a passage for those entering the Old City through Dung Gate on the south side (mostly Palestinians who go to their workplaces, schools and markets. It is the route of Christians to the Holy Sepulcher and of Muslim pilgrims during Ramadan, and other holidays to the Haram al-Sharif or Temple Mount. It is also the path that Jews residing in the Jewish Quarter and in the western part of the city us to get to the Western Wall. Most of us can only dream about what she sees from her window everyday.

Safdie has two contrasting perspectives from that window. Across toward the Western Wall precinct are vast ceremonial spaces and the silhouette of the Old City quarters. Directly below the window in the alley and terraces are a great variety of people who seek both the sacred and the morning and evening cycles of life’s routines. Safdie’s photographs capture personal moments alongside large-scale public events in the city of Jerusalem, where belief and ritual come together and shape life.

Michal Ronnen Safdie was born in Jerusalem and studied sociology and anthropology. Her photographs have unusual range. There are subjects from the natural world and there is Jerusalem. I find it difficult to express the emotions that we feel as we look at the photographs in this book and therefore I am better not describing them at all. For me, viewing them is a highly personal experience as it will be for many of you.

“Marilyn Monroe: The Private Life of Public Icon” by Charles Casillo— Marilyn’s Secret Selves

Casillo, Charles. “Marilyn Monroe: The Private Life of Public Icon”, St. Martin’s. 2018.

Marilyn’s Secret Selves

Amos Lassen

Let me start off by saying that I have never been a fan of Marilyn Monroe yet I am quite a fan of Charles Casillo and have read and reviewed all of his books. What happened with this books, and it is one of many that I have read about the legendary star, it that after all of these years, I am becoming a fan. Writer Casillo has based his book on new interviews and research thus giving us a groundbreaking new biography that explores the secret selves behind Marilyn Monroe’s public facades. Naturally there will be detractors and I say to them, “read this before you have negative comments. You will probably be very surprised”.

I have always been amazed that Marilyn Monroe continues to amaze and captivate us. “Her beauty still captivates. Her love life still fascinates. Her story still dominates popular culture.” I really have no idea why this is so and I find it amazing how it took death to grant her such legendary status. We have not seen this with other actresses who were just as famous if not more so. Casillo now looks years of research and dozens of new interviews to introduce us you to the Marilyn Monroe we have always wanted to know and we see her as “a living, breathing, complex woman, bewitching and maddening, brilliant yet flawed.” She certainly knew how to create an image and sell it.

Casillo has studied Monroe’s life through the context of her times especially in the days before feminism. We learn of Monroe’s struggle with bipolar disorder and learn there were not adequate means of dealing with it. We read once again of her abusive childhood but new we see that despite this, her “extreme ambition inspired her to transform each celebrated love affair and each tragedy into another step in her journey towards immortality.” Casillo concentrates on the last two years of her life, including her involvement with both John F. Kennedy and his brother Robert, and the mystery of her last day.

Then there are the little facts that we learn that were unknown to us in the past. Casillo shares that even though there was talk about the rivalry between Elizabeth Taylor and Monroe, we learn that Taylor secretly reached out and tried to help Marilyn during one of her darkest moments. The much spoken of Monroe’s semi-nude love scene with Clark Gable long thought to be lost brings us a new revelation and a few nights before she died, Marilyn met Warren Beatty at a party and shared some of the reasons for her final despair. Casillo has resurrected that last day and he gives us “a meticulously detailed account of the events of her last day, revealing how a series of miscommunications and misjudgments contributed to her death.”

I wondered why Casillo would chose to write a book about a subject that has been covered over and over again and that question is soon answered once I began to read. I was so drawn into the material that I read the entire book in one sitting and then spent several hours thinking about it. As you can see, I am still thinking about it.

This is a wonderfully written look at the mystique of a woman who is still fascinating almost sixty years after her death. We knew she had a troubled life and Casillo pays careful attention to her emotional journey and this is what I believe sets this biography apart from others. She was a real woman who became a goddess and a very complex modern day heroine and an honest and vulnerable woman.

If you think that you knew Marilyn Monroe, you might be very surprised.

“The New American Judaism: How Jews Practice Their Religion Today” by Jack Wertheimer— American Judaism Today

Wertheimer, Jack. “The New American Judaism: How Jews Practice Their Religion Today”, Princeton University Press, 2018.

American Judaism Today

Amos Lassen

American Judaism has had to deal with what many other American religions have had to face of late— social upheavals, a decline in the number of participants over the past forty years, and many who remain active and struggle to find a way to reconcile their holy traditions with new perspectives. These include feminism and the LGBTQ movement to “do-it-yourself religion” and personally defined spirituality. I often find it interesting to take a look at American Judaism today with its many changes and some of the changes have come so fast that it is really difficult to get a total perspective. Jack Wertheimer is a leading authority on the new American Judaism and has set out to discover how Jews of various orientations practice their religion today. He looks at which observances still resonate, and which ones have been given new meaning, what options are available for seekers or those dissatisfied with conventional forms of Judaism and how are synagogues responding. It is all the more interesting when we understand that there is no central body to go to with questions like these and that decisions are made by individuals. Yet there are answers and many of them are surprising.

Wertheimer uses a variety of sources—survey data, visits to countless synagogues, and interviews with more than two hundred rabbis and other informed observers. He finds that the majority of American Jews still identifies with their faith but often practice it on their own terms. Not surprisingly, gender barriers are loosening within religiously traditional communities, while some of the most progressive sectors are bringing back long-discarded practices. We now have “start-ups” led by charismatic young rabbis and the explosive growth of Orthodox “outreach,” and unconventional worship experiences that are geared toward millennials. I remember growing up and being told that we are not a proselytizing religion only to learn that this is not necessarily so today.

LIke I said, there are many surprises about when and how American Jews practice their religion and many possibilities for “significant renewal.” in American Judaism. Judaism is being creative reinvented due to religious illiteracy and dynamic experimentation.

Wertheim gives us his findings descriptively, analytically, and futuristically. This is an important book for those of us who are interested in the future of the Jewish people. We get a lot to think about as we look at Judaism against the backdrop of American religious trends in this country. We have here broad patterns and many details about Judaism as it is today and we get a manifesto for a “powerful prescription for a flourishing, quotidian Judaism” and this should bring about important discussions not just about Judaism but also about religious life today.

 

“PERMANENT GREEN LIGHT”— A French Teen

“PERMANENT GREEN LIGHT”

A French Teen

Amos Lassen

“Permanent Green Light” is a new feature film from co-directors Dennis Cooper and Zac Farley and it is as subversive as Cooper’s most dangerous works of fiction yet without any of the overtly shocking Cooper staples such as killing sprees, cannibalism, and necrophilia or extreme fetishists. It is about Roman (Benjamin Sulpice), a detached French teen who wants to blow himself up in public, not as a grand ideological gesture or to put an end to his suffering, but for the sheer spectacle of it. Cooper’s fiction tends to portray pretty, troubled young guys and the predators who want to harm them As a teen, Cooper was inspired by the work of the Marquis de Sade, and wanting to tap into the dysfunctional family dynamics, reckless drug taking and so he set about writing with an absolute “purity of intent”. His fascination for sexual violence fills his prose, allowing him to explore thoughts and feelings others would never dare to.

Cooper’s novels have a novel way of dealing with sex, as do his cinematic versions of his work. “Permanent Green Light” has a foreboding sense of suburban ennui. His character here just wants to disappear. The film introduces the notion that a person who wants to explode but doesn’t want to die, and above all doesn’t want anyone thinking he has died when he blows himself up in public. It is like searching for the ultimate magic trick that’s completely implausible yet very ephemeral. Roman is the ultimate magician, because he wants to create a total spectacle, which requires complete commitment, whether that is his disappearance or his death.

In this film, none of the characters are objectified or preyed on by older, predatory types. In fact, none appear to even remotely think about sex except one guy lusting after Roman. We are very aware of the film’s deep respect for the complexities and desires that are part of the teenage experience. If Roman was 35 years old, the audience would think that he has mental problems because he is past adolescence and is supposed to be an adult. Roman’s quest is set in that weird teenage period, which is quite scary, volatile and confusing to people, because that’s when anything is possible. Because of the nature of the film, I am limited to what I can say without writing spoilers so I will stop here and leave it to you to draw your own conclusions.

“PORCUPINE LAKE”— On The Verge of Adulthood

“Porcupine Lake”

On the Verge of Adulthood

Amos Lassen

Porcupine Lake is a story of the secret life of girls set in Northern Ontario during one hot and hazy summer when adulthood has not yet arrived and childhood is ending quickly.

Director Ingrid Veninger’s coming of age story is set during a summer on the Canadian countryside when two young girls are approaching adulthood. As we know, the early stages of puberty are among the most turbulent periods of anybody’s life and come with intensified emotions. Veninger deliberately makes the very nature of the relationship between her two central characters open to interpretation; they’re either struggling with their newfound sexuality for the first time, or are friends with disparate life paths who form an intense bond due to the alienation of the beginning of their teenage years.

Bea (Charlotte Salisbury) is a young girl from Toronto who is spending the summer with her parents in remote Northern Ontario, where they own a diner. At night she is alone at home reading instead of making friends and her parents are concerned about her loneliness. Then she meets Kate (Lucinda Armstrong Hall), a local girl with a depressing home life that causes her to believe she’s adopted. Both feel disenfranchised by their surroundings, and instantly become fast friends and their bond becomes stronger as the summer goes on.

Bea acts as both an audience surrogate, and a catalyst to anchor the characters around her. She’s timid and totally believable. Kate is dealing with aggressive, indifferent siblings and a parental figure that seemingly couldn’t care less about her presence.

Whether or not this about an intense friendship, or a relationship between two confused young girls, “Porcupine Lake” is an impressive drama about two characters caught between childhood and a forever elusive emotional maturity. It has heartfelt and achingly real performances and is quite delightful.

“Good Kids, Bad City: A Story of Race and Wrongful Conviction in America” by Kyle Swenson— A Shocker That Should Not Shock Us

Swenson, Kyle. “Good Kids, Bad City: A Story of Race and Wrongful Conviction in America”, Picador, 2019.

A Shocker That Should Not Shock Us

Amos Lassen

We live in a country that even though is a democracy and modern lacks in issues of race. It is still true today that young black men are being stopped by the police simply because of the color of their skin and we all are well aware of this. Yet, it has not stopped. Even worse is that skin color can cause a verdict to be laid down that is not only wrong but also unjust. This is really what we see here in Kyle Swenson’s heartbreaking study “Good Kids, Bad City: A Story of Race and Wrongful Conviction in America”. It is difficult to read this without becoming very, very angry.

“Good Kids, Bad City” is the story of the longest wrongful imprisonment in the United States to end in exoneration, and a critical social and political history of Cleveland, the city that convicted them. In the early 1970s, three African-American men, Wiley Bridgeman, Kwame Ajamu, and Rickey Jackson were accused and convicted of the brutal robbery and murder of a man outside of a convenience store in Cleveland, Ohio. The prosecution’s case, which resulted in a combined 106 years in prison for the three men, rested on the exceedingly questionable testimony of a pre-teen, Ed Vernon.

The actual murderer was never found. Almost forty years later, Vernon recanted his testimony, and the three men were released. Even though their exoneration may have ended one of American history’s most disgraceful miscarriages of justice, the corruption and decay of the city responsible for their imprisonment remain on trial today.

Writer Swenson brings together the dramatic details of the case with Cleveland’s history one that still today is filled with systemic discrimination and racial tension. Swenson shows us how this miscarriage of justice occurred and why. The book is a work of astonishing empathy and insight as well as an immersive exploration of race in American how lost lives can be recovered. What is so sad is that this will probably happen again and again.

“Exit Plans for Teenage Freaks” by Nathan Burgoine— Finding His Place

Burgoine, Nathan. “Exit Plans for Teenage Freaks”, Bold Strokes Books, 2018.

Finding His Place

Amos Lassen

Most of us seem to forget how difficult adolescence is once we leave it behind us. Here we meet seventeen-year-old Cole whose plan is to get through high school with good grades and without any trouble. He is at peace with his sexuality and he faces his life head-on. But then there was the day when after entering his school building, he realized that he is not in the building at all. In fact, he finds himself in the museum he had just been thinking about and must decide if there is something wrong with him or he has been teleported.

Cole knows himself and I think that it is this self-knowledge that makes him such a loveable character despite his awkwardness and nerdiness (sort of like the runt of the litter that you cannot help but love). In fact all of the characters in this young adult novel and well-defined characters that act and speak the way teenagers do.

We have had more than enough coming out young adult novels and the fact that this is not one of those makes this book a pleasure to read. We do not meet the characters as they are coming out but rather after they are out and at pace with themselves.

The kids here are lesbian, gay, asexual, transgender, bisexual, and pansexual characters but they are, above all else, kids whose sexualities are incidental to their lives. They are teens who to go to school, have crushes, are experiencing adolescence just like all other teens. But this is where reality stops and if you want to understand what I mean by that you will have to read the book. I found the plot to be secondary to the characters. There is a lot going on and, in fact, the plot is very busy; perhaps a bit too busy. I could have done without so much going on and instead spending time with my new teen friends. One other problem that I had is the prose and that is because the majority of my life has been spent in teaching writing courses but I will let you discover the writing for yourselves. I hate to laud a book for one reason and then tear it apart for another so I will simply say that is a fun read about a world we were all once a part of to which we can never return (except when others return for us).

“Promised Land” by Martin Fletcher— “One Brother Builds Israel, the Other Protects it”

Fletcher. Martin. “Promised Land: A Novel of Israel”. Thomas Dunne Books, St. Martin’s Press, 2018.

“One Brother Builds Israel, the Other Protects it”

Amos Lassen

Martin Fletcher was the head of NBC TV’s Tel Aviv News Bureau and her certainly knows Israel. He brings us “Promised Land”, a story of Israel that will no doubt compared to Leon Uris’ “Exodus”. It is a “story of triumph and tragedy, new love and historic hate” that is told by unforgettable characters. The story of the creation of the state of Israel is in itself epic and therefore demands an expert storyteller and that describers Fletcher perfectly. The prose is gorgeous and the story is exciting. We could not ask for more. “Promised Land” is the story of two brothers and the woman they love set against the founding of Israel.

The story begins when fourteen-year-old Peter is sent to America in order to escape what was happening in Nazi Germany. His younger brother Arie and their entire family are sent to the death camps and only Arie survives.

Years later, the brothers reunite in the new Jewish state, where Arie has become a businessman and one of the richest men in Israel. Peter becomes a top Mossad agent heading some of Israel’s most vital espionage operations. “One brother builds Israel, the other protects it.”

They both fall in love with the same woman, Tamara, a lonely Jewish refugee from Cairo. During the following twenty years as their new homeland faces tremendous obstacles and odds that could destroy it, the brothers face intrigues, jealousies and political strife that could tear their new lives apart.

We are reminded that the pioneers, settlers, immigrants and founders of Israel worked very hard to build a powerful country and a democratic presence in a hostile environment and paid heavily to do so. Fletcher explains the history and conflicts of the early years of Israel’s statehood never letting us forget that those pioneers and builders were reeling from the horrors and pain of the Holocaust. Many of our characters here are struggling to cope with their losses and create new lives and homes for themselves. Everybody has his/her burden to bear.

Fletcher not only gives us the history of the country but also a look at how people lived in Israel at that time in her history. We are more than aware of the military struggles the young nation faces and how it was to live at a time when war was always imminent. The addition of Tamara and the romance heightens the already tense atmosphere that Israelis were forced to live with.

The major problem I had with the book is that Leon Uris set the mark very high with “Exodus” and most authors that tried to give us something similar did not measure up. While the story of Tamara helped us to understand the unease that existed then in the country, I had trouble understanding her purpose in the story and I felt she intruded on the larger picture.

Aside from that I wanted a bit more character development and I longed for a hero to fill the shoes of an Ari Ben Canaan and his brother Barak. I also question the timing of the release of this novel since Israel is going through a really rough period now and I think we need more of a sense of reality than fiction right now.

Quite basically, this is the story of the first twenty years of Israel and I was there during the last five years of that period and I found much of the novel to be true to life descriptively. Using the two brothers is a clever way to bring in the story as seen through the eyes of the founding generation. While this is fiction, it also gives us an inside look at the passion of the people building a nation and this is what matters above all else.

“Homoculture”— A New Series

 

HOMOCULTURE VOLUME ONE

THE FIRST IN A NEW SERIES OF BOOKS FROM PUBLISHER OUTTHERE, HOMOCULTURE VOLUME ONE TRAINS A UNIQUELY GLOBAL LENS ON LGBTQI CREATIVITY AND EXPERIENCE.

LIMITED EDITION COLLECTORS’ ITEM, 1000 COPIES
160 PAGES
COVER IMAGE: ROY ANTHONY BROWN BY ANDREAS H. BITESNICH
INNER COVER ARTWORK BY JACOB LOVE

SERIOUSLY QUEER.

EXPLORING THE VIBRANCY, DIVERSITY, SPIRIT, TRUTH AND FUN OF THE LGBTQI COMMUNITY AWAY FROM ASSIMILATIONIST MAINSTREAM LORE. 160 PAGES OF ORIGINAL, THOUGHT-PROVOKING CONTENT FROM CONTRIBUTORS FROM AROUND THE GLOBE.

INSIDE THIS ISSUE (VOLUME ONE):
HOMOCULTURE VOLUME ONE TRAINS A UNIQUELY GLOBAL LENS ON LGBTQI CREATIVITY AND EXPERIENCE. EXPLORING SOME OF THE WORLD’S MOST FASCINATING QUEER TRIBES, FROM AMERICA’S RADICAL FAERIE MOVEMENT TO TRANS* ACTIVISTS IN AFRICA, FROM A LA LATIN ART-BEAR COLLECTIVE TO THE DELIRIOUS EAST LONDON DRAG DIVAS WHO WORK GLASTONBURY FESTIVAL.

WE MEET ROSE WOOD, NEW YORK’S DOYENNE OF EXTREME CABARET, CONTROVERSY-COURTING RUSSIAN ARTIST IN EXILE SLAVA MOGUTIN AND THE LEGENDARY LONDON CLUB KID, MODEL AND MUSE TURNED SINGER-SONGWRITER (AND OUR COVER STAR) ROY BROWN. WE PROFILE TALENTS INCLUDING BRAZILIAN CHOREOGRAPHER JEAN ABREU, GERMAN FETISH DOCUMENTARIST JAN SOLDAT, AVANT-GARDE JAPANESE PERFORMANCE ARTIST TAKAO KAWAGUCHI AND MANY MORE.

OUR FIRST ARTIST’S RESIDENCY FEATURES THE PROLIFIC JACOB LOVE, CONTRIBUTING A GORGEOUS PHOTO ESSAY AND BESPOKE ARTWORKS, WHILE THE FETED NOVELIST JONATHAN KEMP REVEALS A NEW SHORT STORY.

SERIOUSLY QUEER, HOMOCULTURE SEEKS TO RECLAIM FROM ASSIMILATIONIST ENCROACHMENTS A SACRED SPACE WHERE WE CAN EXPLORE THE SPIRIT, TRUTH AND FUN OF OUR COMMUNITY’S RICH DIFFERENCE. NOT FOR NOTHING HAVE MANY ANCIENT AND NON-WESTERN CIVILISATIONS REVERED OUR INNATE NON-NORMATIVITY AS A NEAR-SUPERNATURAL GIFT. WE ENTHUSIASTICALLY CONCUR, AND THIS VOLUME IS OUR INVITATION TO ALL QUEERS, DYKES, FAGS, BIS, TRANS, INTERS, UNDECIDED AND OTHERS TO CONNECT, COMMUNE AND SET FREE THEIR HIGHEST SELVES.

CHAPTER ONE / CREATORS
CHASEN IGLEHEART / JEAN ABREU / BISHI BHATTACHARYA / BERTIL NILSSON / JAN SOLDAT / TRAVIS RIDLEHUBER / TAKAO KAWAGUCHI

CHAPTER TWO / VOICES
JACOB LOVE + TIM MARSHALL / JONATHAN KEMP + JENNIFER TYBURCZY / CLIFFORD LANDON PUN + RICHARD YAP + KHALIL WEST / CHARLES O’BYRNE / PAOLA REVENIOTI + PANOS H. KOUTRAS / SURAT KNAN + AJAMU + PAUL BONHAM

CHAPTER THREE / TRIBES
NYC DOWNLOW + BLOCK 9 / GABRIELLE LE ROUX / MARICON COLLECTIVE / RADICAL FAERIES / JACOB LOVE

CHAPTER FOUR / OUTRIDERS
ROSE WOOD / ROY BROWN / CARLOS PONS GUERRA / ANDREW LOGAN / SIYA NGCOBO / CHUCK HOLMES / SLAVA MOGUTIN

FURTHER READING
GREGG CIHANGIR MASUAK / EMIR CAKA ERKAYA / JONATHAN KEMP

ABOUT HOMOCULTURE MAG:
HOMOCULTURE’S CORE TEAM IS JUST THAT – THE CORE OF A PLANET-WIDE NETWORK OF COLLABORATORS AND FRIENDS IT’S OUR MISSION AND PLEASURE TO CONTINUOUSLY GROW. WE AIM TO FORGE AN ORIGINAL, AUTHENTIC, ENLIGHTENING AND LIFE-AFFIRMING PLATFORM FOR VOICES, VISIONS AND EXPRESSIONS OF CREATIVITY THAT ILLUMINATE THE COUNTLESS WAYS THE WORLD’S LGBTQI POPULATION MAKES UP A UNIQUE COMMUNITY – AND CELEBRATE THE HEROIC IDIOSYNCRASIES THAT MAKE EVERY ONE OF US AN UNPRECEDENTED INDIVIDUAL.

INSPIRED BY LUMINARIES FROM JEAN GENET TO DEREK JARMAN, FROM GRACE JONES TO FRANCIS BACON, FROM C.P. CAVAFY TO THE COCKETTES AND FROM PENNY ARCADE TO DV8, HOMOCULTURE HONOURS TRAILBLAZING CREATORS ACROSS SPECTRUMS OF GENDER, RACE, AGE AND GEOGRAPHY. WHILE WE’RE THRILLED TO DISCOVER EMERGING TALENTS, WE’RE JUST AS EXCITED TO PROBE THE NEW PERSPECTIVES THAT OUR EVOLVING CULTURAL LANDSCAPES OPEN UP ON ENDURING QUEER ALUMNI. WE’RE PROUD TO SHOWCASE THEIR WORK ALONGSIDE COMPELLING ACCOUNTS OF DAILY EXPERIENCE THAT CAST LIGHT ON LGBTQIS’ PLACE IN TODAY’S WORLD.

EDITORIAL TEAM: RUPERT MELLOR (EDITOR), MARTIN PERRY (CREATIVE/EDITORIAL DIRECTOR), UWERN JONG (PUBLISHING DIRECTOR), EMILY CARLTON (MANAGING EDITOR), STEVEN EAST (SUB-EDITOR)

CONTRIBUTORS: AJAMU, BEN WALTERS, CHARLES O’BYRNE, CLIFFORD LANDON PUN, EMIR ÇAKA ERKAYA, GREGG CIHANGIR MASUAK, JACK GIBBS, JACOB LOVE, JENNIFER TYBURCZY, JONATHAN KEMP, KHALIL WEST, LEO MORGAN, MICHELLE OLLEY, PANOS H. KOUTRAS, PAOLA REVENIOTI, PAUL BONHAM, RICHARD YAP, GECKO AKA STEPHEN FLEITZ, SURAT-SHAAN RATHGEBER KNAN, TIM MARSHALL, TOM RASMUSSEN, TRISTAN VERRAN, ULI HAEMMING, ZACK CAHILL

Regular price $29.99

On REVRY in AUGUST

Revry is proud to announce the launch of it’s new updated app along with new and original content for August.

August Content Trailer:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ko1edl3a5dy1yyh/outnowextendedfinal.mp4?dl=0

Enjoy LGBTQ+ film, music, series, podcasts, and originals with the new and improved Revry app – the first in global queer streaming! Enjoy Revry’s international queer content FREE instantly with ads! Revry has redesigned and reimagined the way you stream queer content with new features like Collections, to find specially curated selections or the easy-to-use Categories to find the specific content you’re looking for. Discovering new content easy and seamless with smart suggestions for related content based on what you’ve previously watched. Download the all-new Revry app today and discover thousands of hours of truly queer content created by and for our communities! Enjoy Original films, series, music and podcasts. Available on the web, iOS, Apple TV, Android, Amazon Fire, Android TV, and Roku. stream. out. loud.

New Content List Below. And here is a link to artwork of the New Content:

ON REVRY IN AUGUST

AUGUST 3RD

Loss Prevention (Revry Original Film):

When an old-school bar owner and his unruly daughter get caught up in a cat-and-mouse game of corporate espionage, it will take brains, brawn, and help from the lesser of two evils to make it out alive.

Barbelle (Revry Original Series):
Following the overnight success of their music duo Barbelle, Veronica and Alice go from unknown couple to internet pop-stars in a blitzkrieg of record deals, performances, and an invasive public. As instant stardom puts its toll on their relationship leading up to their second record, Veronica and Alice learn that it’s not just the internet shipping their romance but a contractual clause keeping Barbelle a couple.

Little Sista (Revry Original Series):

Commitmentphobe Charmaine must learn to grow up when she is paired with an at-risk youth in a Big Brother, Big Sister program.

Joey Suarez (Revry Exclusive Music Artist):
Drawing from a wide range of musical influences including Linkin Park, Miley Cyrus and Daft Punk. Joey Suarez has crafted a style of music truly unique to what we currently hear on the radio.

Pushing Dead (Feature Film):
When a struggling writer, HIV positive for 20+ years, accidentally deposits a $100 birthday check, he is dropped from his health plan for earning too much. In this new era of sort-of universal care, can he take on a helpless bureaucracy or come up with $3000 a month to buy meds on his own?

Eixos (Digital Series):
It’s 2060 and the Brazilian nation is thrown into disarray. Its once proud capital Brasilia has been left abandoned and forgotten, inhabited only by a handful of wandering citizens – until, that is, they start mysteriously disappearing.

Happy Playland (Digital Series):
Billie, an anxious actress caught between her passion for stage, and her parents’ dreams of the silver screens starts a new job at a desolate indoor playground, managed by wannabe-insta-star Cris. Billie quickly develops feelings for social justice warrior, Zara, who is sadly, 23 and not looking for anything serious.

INA (Music Artist):

INA is a Swedish pop artist who’s been seen on MTV, LOGO TV and performed at the American Music Awards. She’s a voting member of the Grammy recording academy, winner of IndieNation Awards, LA Hard Rock Rising and LA Music Awards. INA performed the main stage at this years Long Beach Pride and had her EP release party at Tigerheat, Avalon. She recently signed with Revry and had a screening at Out Web Fest Awards for her latest music video “Overthinking”. The video will premiere on Revry TV.

Matt Palmer (Music Artist):
Matt Palmer is an LA-based Pop/R&B singer-songwriter, and he is preparing to release a seven song Visual EP entitled Get Lost. 2014’s Stranger Than Fiction marked his debut as an openly gay artist, and Get Lost delves even deeper by telling the story of a
specific relationship from start to finish. The visual co-stars Instagram celebrity Max Emerson, and the dance-inspired tracks were produced by A-Minor, Drew Scott, and NAKID (formerly Edwynn x Tikal), among others.

Gabe Lopez (Music Artist):
Gabe Lopez has recently crossed the US and UK opening for Belinda Carlisle on her 2014-2017 tours. His songs are currently on Sirius XM Radio, iHeart Radio, and FM radio – most recently his new singles “LASSO” and “CALIFORNIA BLUES,” which features the pop icon BELINDA CARLISLE. He has produced and written for BELINDA CARLISLE, NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK, JOEY McINTYRE, JAMES BROWN, KRAYZIE BONE, CHARICE, TYLER HILTON, MS. TRINITI, SHINEE, TAE YANG, SUPERJUNIOR, STREETLIGHT HARMONIES SOUNDTRACK, EMERY KELLY, VARSITY FANCLUB and more.

AUGUST
17TH

Edge of Normal (Digital Series):
Six teenage girls have a secret. They all possess extraordinary, mysterious and dangerous powers and struggle to grow up in a world where their mistakes have deadly repercussions.

John Loos: Too Big for this World (Digital Series):
“John Loos: Too Big for this World” is a sketch comedy series in the vein of Key & Peele and Inside Amy Schumer, but not like those at all, and 500 times gayer.

She (Short Documentary):
“She” follows Tanesh Nutall, a black transgender woman from Rahway, NJ, who was dismissed from using a women’s restroom in downtown San Francisco. In addition, Tanesh revisits her family as a transgender woman after not having seen them for 20+ years.

Golden Boys (Short Film):

Scott, Dylan and Carter, three longtime friends on an unexpected bender, break into their old private school looking for some reckless fun. But soon, long forgotten memories come back to the surface, reminding Scott of his confusing friendship with Dylan and the difficult reality of his private school past.

EB Rebel (Music Artist):
In 2016, EB Rebel released her EP “TRANCE” with the lead single “Don’t Care”. The song received mounds of favorable press including a feature in the national publication Afropunk. “Don’t Care” was also featured on the soundtrack for “Stay Woke” a BET documentary produced by Jesse Williams, which also featured hip hop greats J.Cole and Kendrick Lamar. Rebel released her latest EP “Mama, I’m Ok” in May 2018.

AUGUST
24TH

Putting On (Revry Original Series):
“Putting On” is a docu-series following On Mekahel, a model and entrepreneur who starts an underwear company with his ex-boyfriend.

What’s the T? (Feature Documentary):
“What’s the T” is a documentary that explores the challenges, successes and lives of five transgender women. These five women represent normality and abnormality, seamlessly in their daily efforts to achieve a balance of feminine and masculine as the day may require.

Naranja (Animated Short Film):
A woman endures harassment and catcalling, reflected in the spots these acts leave behind.

Cocoon (Short Film):
An adolescent girl in China discovers her mother’s secret, which disrupts her family life.

AUGUST
31ST

Shopping For Fangs (Feature Film):
A lesbian and a man, who believes he might be a werewolf, find out who they really are.

In This Family (Short Documentary):
What is it like coming
out as a gay teen in the Philippines? In a country imbued with traditional Catholic views, coming out is received with disapproval and anger, especially from one’s own family.

About Revry
Revry is the premier queer digital media network for the inclusive 21st century LGBTQ+ community. As the first-ever global queer streaming service, Revry offers a uniquely curated selection of domestic and international entertainment that includes iconic, award-winning narrative and documentary films, cutting-edge series and originals along with the world’s largest queer libraries of groundbreaking podcasts, music albums and videos. Revry is available worldwide on seven OTT, mobile, and online platforms, and hosts the only exclusive LGBTQ linear channels on Pluto TV and XUMO, reaching up to 70 million people in over 100 countries. Headquartered in Los Angeles, Revry is led by an inclusive team of queer, multi-ethnic and allied partners who bring decades of experience in the fields of tech, digital media, and queer advocacy. Follow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram @REVRYTV. Go Online to: https://revry.tv.