“ETCHED IN GLASS: THE LEGACY OF STEVE ROSS”— Finding a Second Life

“Etched in Glass: The Legacy of Steve Ross”

Finding a Second Life

Amos Lassen

We have had so many stories and films about the Holocaust that for one to have something new to say, it must really be special and special is “Etched in Glass”. The film is the real-life story of how one remarkable Polish man found a second life in America and dedicating his life to helping people. This is the story of Steve Ross who spent five terrible and horrific years in ten concentration camps when he was a child and then spent the rest of his life in the service of his adopted country, America, as he searched for the American soldier who helped free him from “the gates of hell” and the most terrible time in the history of the world. I do not know Steve Ross but I am still new to Boston but I have known stories like this as well as others from having lived with Holocaust survivors on my kibbutz in Israel. Perhaps that is why I opened this review the way that I did.   I am worried that too many stories could lessen the impact of what we have to know about German anti-Semitism during the period around World War II.

Steve Ross, along with others, tells us about his survival, his emigration to the United States and his resettlement in the Boston area. We meet Ross’ first and oldest friend in America who is now a retired surgeon and we learn how Steve coped with his first taste of American life.

We follow Ross from being a shy timid orphan to becoming a licensed psychologist. We see how he changed lives over and over again, by getting kids off the streets and away from crime. and into the classroom. We meet a man who was saved from a life of crime, urged to get an education and who became a successful attorney and who feels that he owes his life to Steve Ross, his mentor. Ross worked his own way through college are earned three degrees just so he could be an advocate and advisor to young, at-risk people who needed help most and this is what he has done for over 40 years. Steve Ross is also responsible for the founding of the New England Holocaust Memorial. We learn how it came about with the aid of former Boston Mayor Ray Flynn and the idea being fostered with tenacity by Ross.

There was initial opposition but the now-iconic memorial stands on Boston’s Freedom Trail and it is there in order to educate and enlighten thousands of visitors each week.

On Veterans’ Day at the ceremony at Boston’s State House on November 11, 2012, the film ends emotionally. It is there that Ross finally meets the family of the soldier who liberated him from Dachau after a 67-year search (thanks to an episode of “Unsolved Mysteries” found on You Tube by the granddaughter of the soldier). This is an amazing and touching story not only about Steve Ross but also about the union of 2 families who were brought together by the good deed of a soldier who showed kindness to a teenage boy near death. Like other Holocaust films, this is a story of survival, perseverance and hope. Unlike other Holocaust films, this has Steve Ross.

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