“TAHARA” —Best Friends

“TAHARA”

Best Friends

Amos Lassen

Tahara” begins as a narrative of two best friends Carrie Lowstein (Madeline Grey DeFreece) and Hannah Rosen (Rachel Sennott) as they are in the midst of adolescent self-discovery. Director Olivia Peace explores the coming together of female friendships, sexual identity and rejection through the polarity of these two characters. “Tahara” looks at each defining moment through the demise of the girl’s friendship. Set over the course of one day and during a classmate’s funeral, what Carrie wanted to believe was a bond is turns out to be Hannah’s manipulation as a tool for her own gain.It takes place in the synagogue  during a funeral and grief class held after, the characters’ grief for the loss of Samantha Goldstein to suicide, the film examines the “real” issues in their life. The funeral is simply a location for the teenagers to carry out their sexual agendas and use the tragedy as a platform for their moral campaign. 

 

Carrie is frustrated with Hannah’s insistent pursuit of one out of the two guys in their grief class (the second guy being completely high on pot brownies the whole time) during what is supposed to be a time of reflection. Carrie and Hannah end up on a couch in the Synagogue’s bathroom where Hannah brags about her sexual resume and Carrie shares her minor experiences. So that she can validate her own skills, Hannah pressures Carrie into kissing her as “practice.” Hannah’s intention is self-serving, but the moment engulfs Carrie, and we learn that who was once her childhood friend is and has always been her quest through her as a black, Jewish and queer teen.

Hannah is quite sneaky when it comes to catching any and all opportunity to seduce her male suitor. When identifying Carrie’s feelings and her crush’s coincidental interest in Carrie, Hannah sets a trap in the Synagogue’s library to bring about a three-way. Hannah wields Carrie’s affection and loyalty to finally hook up with the mildly attractive dunce she had been after this whole time. This ended in a love triangle of rejection with each of them leaving hurt and confused but most of all, Carrie feels the consequences.

“Tahara” looks at the potential of toxicity in friendships that take place early in life and favors the idea of disconnecting from these bonds no matter the time invested in Carrie’s childhood. The film sheds light on the imbalanced sense of self-identity both teenagers and adults face, and the role that those closest to them have in changing things.

Coming of age so often feels inauthentic, especially when it’s stylized. Here, the teenagers talk like teenagers — they don’t always agree, they tease one another lovingly, and they examine their own insecurities. They complain about how their school tries to make them confront grief, and they lash out about their feelings. They’re young and they’re still finding out more about themselves, and Hannah doesn’t even want to approach how she feels, even if Carrie has confronted her.

Here is the queer Jewish experience boldly expressed at a young age. The film’s title refers to a Jewish ritual act of purifying the body after death. Not only is this discussed in a classroom scene, but the death of a classmate is what purifies the relationship to the simplest shared feelings for the two girls. “Tahara” is completely about the girls and not the power structures surrounding them. They question their faith and how it tells them to grieve, but as a setting and not as a conflict.

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