“THE SUSPICIOUS DEATH OF A MINOR”— A Mystery

“The Suspicious Death Of A Minor”

A Mystery

Amos Lassen

Paolo Germi (Claudio Cassinelli) is undercover cop on the trail of a Milanese criminal outfit following the brutal murder of Marisa (Patrizia Castaldi), an underage prostitute. But a killer-for-hire is also on the prowl and killing witnesses before they have a chance to talk.

Sergio Martino’s 1975 film belongs more to the crime and action subgenre than any other. Germi is aided by his streetwise assistant Giannino (Adolfo Caruso). They discover that the prostitute who was executed in order to cover up a wide-ranging underground ring of white slavery and teen exploitation. Tensions mount, as Germi realizes he’ll need to expose the circle of corruption even as others continue to die at the hands of the increasingly desperate killer.

 

Germi soon uncovers, after the death of the next victim a friend of Marisa’s that there was a third girl, and that they were all forced into prostitution. The first murder is the most violent murder of the film and the victim is killed with a blade. There are only a couple more deaths in the rest of the film and there are rather tame and nearly bloodless.

Sergio Martino delivers stylish set pieces that are offset by quirky moments such as a man nearly getting hit by a car and landing on his head or a bicyclist having his bike chopped in half by a speeding by car. There are two standout action sequences. The first takes place on a roller coaster when a hit man tries to kill Detective Paolo Germi on a roller coaster because he is getting to close to the truth. The other is actually a continuation of the roller coaster shoot out. The pacing of the film keeps things moving at a rapid pace ad there is rarely an opportunity to catch ones breath while watching this film. To say anymore would ruin the viewing experience for those who have yet to see the film.

 

Bonus Materials include:

  • Brand new 2K restoration of the film from the original camera negative produced by Arrow Video exclusively for this release
  • High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentations
  • Original mono Italian and English soundtracks (lossless on the Blu-ray Disc)
  • English subtitles for the Italian soundtrack
  • Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing for the English soundtrack
  • New audio commentary by Troy Howarth, author of So Deadly, So Perverse: 50 Years of Italian Giallo Films
  • New interviews with director Sergio Martino and cinematographer Giancarlo Ferrando

Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Chris Malbon