“QUEER CITY”— Who We Are

queer city poster

“Queer City”

Who We Are

Amos Lassen

Ever since the Stonewall riots of almost fifty years ago, life has become dramatically different for LGBTQ people. Before Stonewall we were identified by our oppression but have you stopped to think what identifies us now? But who are we now? 

queer city1

The gay movement began in New York City and just we have changed so has the city. “Queer City” looks at those untold stories. It does this through the lives of a highly diverse group of men and women who live there giving us a selection of stories that provide a compelling portrait of new American lives. We also see something about what the future holds for the LGBT community. There are still hateful bigots hanging around and there is still major opposition to who we are and how we live and there are scars we carry with us.

queer city2

We see the routine and the special in the film as it attempts to chronicle how we exist during a major time of change in this country. There are times that the documentary is absolutely hilarious and there are times that it is heartbreaking. The film brings the stories together almost like a fictional narrative and while this is set in New York City, the stories are resonant and relevant to every member of our community.

queer3

We meet and follow “a tough, cool, working-class Latina from Queens with a gift for storytelling and a knack for falling in love”, an eighty-year-old English painter who grew up in the London Blitz and later sought refuge as a gay man in New York who now teaches art to Alzheimer’s patients, an exuberant bisexual woman who has forged a highly successful career as a director of gay adult film, a young, street-smart Haitian man who grew up gender-identified as female, a Brooklyn lesbian couple who met as undergraduates at Yale 25 years ago, and aNew York City politician who was a major force in passing New York State’s same-sex marriage bill”.

queer4

We get to know these people as the movie moves. This is a film that is as important for the “straight” viewer as for “non-straights.” We become aware of the tension between generations in the LGBT community and we see how the term “queer” which we hated so much has become embraced by the younger members of our community. It has become a defining word for lesbians, gay men, bisexuals and trans folk. Director Draper Shreeve puts forth his thesis that LGBT folk are much the same and are defined internally by their mutual oppressions instead of accepting the negative definitions by outsiders. We hear and see interviews that are sincere and powerful.

queer5

There are surprises throughout the film and it is beautifully photographed. I understand that the people we see here were selected because Draper wanted “People who were truly interesting in themselves; that they had stories we had not heard before. But I also wanted to include as diverse a selection as possible across race, gender, age and class. I knew we could tell only so many stories, and could not represent everyone, but I wanted to catch some of the mix of queer American life in 2015.” We see the people here doing ordinary things and this shows us that gay people are just like everyone else. This is an absolutely fascinating film and if I had to settle on saying what the main point of the film is, I would have to say it how we live and how we have not only accepted ourselves but how we have embraced our sexuality and identity and empowered ourselves.

Leave a Reply