Monthly Archives: October 2020

Original LBTQ+ Comedy Series Debuts on Queer Female TV Channel— The OML on Revry Channel Launches with “Socially Distant” Queer Womxn Original

Original LBTQ+ Comedy Series Debuts on Queer Female TV Channel
The OML on Revry Channel Launches with “Socially Distant” Queer Womxn Original
October 29th, 2020 (Los Angeles) OML will release Dating ‘In’ Place, a new original series available to stream exclusively on the new OML on Revrychannel on the Revry Network. OML on Revry is the first 24/7 live TV channel exclusively catering to queer womxn (lesbian, bi, trans female, etc.) available for free globally to over 250+ million households and devices in over 130 countries.
The new series takes a femxle-focused comedic spin on the realities of dating in the “new normal” of a global pandemic and social shutdown. 
Told through the screens and mobile devices of four young women, the show follows Jo, a hopeful romantic who finds the woman of her dreams–only to discover that her crush lives halfway across the world. Not to shrink from a challenge, Jo connects with her crush online, making plans to meet in Hawaii for their official first date…when 2020 hits. 
Dating in Place - Official Trailer
The original series, composed of 10 episodes and filmed from the novel perspective of the four female leads, is created by director, Marina Rice Bader (Ava’s Impossible Things), and Shantell Yasmine Abeydeera (The Influencer, Girls Like Magic) who wrote the series and stars as Jo’s crush Debika. Dating ‘In’ Place brought together a ‘behind the scenes’ dream team inclusive of composer Allyson Newman (The L Word Generation Q) and editor Andrea Maxwell (Spider-Man, Black Panther). The creators believe that the show serves as a perfect time capsule for what’s currently happening in our world. 
“As someone who has always been both challenged and fascinated by the idea of ‘true love’,” says Marina Rice Bader. “I wanted to explore what it means to be on the brink of that magical experience only to have circumstances out of your control crash in and threaten to steal it away from you.” The director adds: “Finding real love is tough enough, you know, without a global pandemic working against you.” 
Shantell Yasmine Abeydeera says: “The pandemic hindered a lot more than just romance. With film productions being shut down indefinitely, filmmakers not only lost their livelihoods but their purpose as storytellers.I saw this as an incredible opportunity to craft a story around the technology that was available to me in the hopes that it would allow me to continue to tell inclusive stories.”  
Like the fictional characters in the series, the filmmakers we’re confronted with their own pandemic-related challenges: the entire production of Dating ‘In’ Place was conducted in complete observance of the “Shelter in Place” order; and cast members operated camera, audio, lighting under the virtual guidance of the show’s director and cinematographer who both worked remotely over video conference. However, the challenges only fostered more creativity in the filmmaking process and the series reflects the versatility and ingenuity of its creators. 
The entire series will be available to stream on Revry (watch.revry.tv/OML) on November 1, 2020 at 5pm (PST) or available for streaming On-Demand at 11am (PST).
The Creators  
Marina Rice Bader  
Marina Rice Bader founded Soul Kiss Films in 2009, where she executive produced Elena Undone and A Perfect Ending then went on to write/direct/produce Anatomy of a Love Seen, Raven’s Touch and Ava’s Impossible Things. Marina is currently developing three features under the banner of her new company Play Big Pictures, producing bold universal stories told through a female lens. She also proudly serves on the board of directors for OUTFEST.  
Shantell Yasmine Abeydeera  
A product of the Land Down Under, Shantell Yasmine Abeydeera is committed to producing female-driven content and has a strong focus on inclusivity. In addition, Shantell has appeared on Good Girls (NBC), Girls Like Magic (OML), and stars in the upcoming indie thriller The Influencer (2021).  
The Cast  
Shantell Yasmine Abeydeera, Emily Goss (Future Man, Seasons of Love), Kari Alison Hodge (Goodkisser, Crazy Bitches) and Mandahla Rose (All About E, Venice: The Series)
ABOUT REVRY
Watch Queer TV 24/7 with the first LGBTQ+ virtual cable TV network. Revry offers free live TV channels and on-demand viewing of its global library featuring LGBTQ+ movies, shows, music, podcasts, news, and exclusive originals all in one place! Revry is currently available globally in over 250+ million households and devices and on seven OTT, mobile, and Desktop platforms. Revry can also be viewed on nine live and on-demand channels and Connected TVs including: The Roku Channel, Samsung TV Plus, Comcast Xfinity X1, Dell, XUMO TV, Zapping TV, STIRR, TiVo+, and as the first LGBTQ+ virtual reality channel on Littlstar (available on PlayStation devices). The company–an inaugural member of the Goldman Sachs Black and LatinX Cohort–is headquartered in Los Angeles and led by a diverse founding team who bring decades of experience in the fields of tech, digital media, and LGBTQ+ advocacy. Follow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram @revrytv, Revry.tv
ABOUT OML
Established in 2009, OML (formerly “One More Lesbian”), began with a simple mission: to become a hub for lesbian members of the LGBTQ+ community seeking visual representation in the media and to allow access to the extremely hard to find content on one platform. By 2020, OML has amassed millions of visitors to its platform and proud to serve over a half million YouTube subscribers, curating not only lesbian content, but quality content for a broader queer audience, inclusive of all female and gender-expansive viewers.

“As If Death Summoned” by Alan E. Rose— The AIDS Epidemic: The Early Days

Rose, Alan E. “As If Death Summoned”, Amble Books, 2020.

The AIDS Epidemic: The Early Days

Amos Lassen

The premier release of the new Amble Books Press is a beautiful book by Alan E. Rose about the early days of the AIDS epidemic. The book beginsin 1936 when a man was caught in a blizzard on the Bogong High Plains of Australia. A search party found him unconscious and took him to the nearest township where he died Afterwards there were stories of a lone figure seen wandering over the heathlands. When he is approached, he vanishes and nothing of him can be found. Sixty years later, a young American returns from Australia and he is haunted by dreams of what happened back then on the Bogong High Plains. Ten years of working on the front lines of the AIDS epidemic there, he, too, is lost but in a different kind of blizzard; one  that has already taken the lives of thirty-one friends of whom the last was his partner and lover. He has reached burn out and is exhausted and often  often mistaken for one of those infected with whatever took his friends and lover but he has stopped correcting people. There was a time when life was not just about death and he tries to remember how that was. As he works with an AIDS organization in Portland, Oregon, he begins to understand his connection to the Bogong High Plains.

Using what happened at Mt. Bogong, Alan Rose has written a story about dealing with grief and how to rebuild a life after it has been shattered by loss. While this is a story about the epidemic, it is also and more importantly a story about accepting what we have experienced including the loss of life and love. It was a terrible time yet it was a time that we learned the value of life. I found myself remembering those I loved and lost and I was able to celebrate having had them in my life. Rose has written an emotional tale that causes us to both laugh and cry and to see that there indeed can be light in the darkest of times. Along with the grief that we shared, a new sense of community developed as the epidemic raged.

The man who tells the story is not named; he is an everyman who represents what we felt. He decided to return to America from Australia after his partner’s death and is asked by the health department to organize and maintain an HIV testing and counseling clinic in Portland, Oregon. He recruits and trains others, solicits funds and works with community outreach specialists. He forms a small group of HIV-positive gay men as he works, he deals with his partner’s death and his own relationships as he faces the challenges of the disease. We enter his mind in order to experience what he feels and this makes this more than just a novel but a look at ourselves. As he works through his grief, we discover a lot about ourselves.

Rose gives us very real characters with which we interact throughout the story and who teach us a great deal. Publishing this during the time when we are all once again suffering from a pandemic makes it all the more real and all the more powerful. While many of us have put HIV/AIDS in the back of our minds, we see the importance and necessity of remembering.

“MADAME”— A Personal Documentary

“MADAME”

A Personal Documentary

Amos Lassen

Stephane Riethauser’s “Madame” is personal documentary in which he introduces us to his 90-year-old grandmother Caroline. The film explores the development of personal and gender identity in a patriarchal environment. 

Based on private archive footage, the film introduces us  to a strong and extravagant female figure who was the most successful businesswoman in Switzerland at a time when women stayed in the kitchen and at home and did not have the right to vote. She was independent and knew how to stand on her own in front of all the men around her. Her grandson who was raised to be the heir to the family business. He is a conservative alpha male and homophobe who suddenly comes out of the closet. Two people from the same family challenge the taboos of gender and sexuality.

Riethauser gives usan extremely honest and unflinching portrait of an aspect of his past.Caroline, the director’s grandmother (and muse) is an elderly woman who is anything but resigned. She seems to a controlled and bourgeois individual with a surprising strength of character. 

The film shows us the close and, at times, difficult relationship between the director and his grandmother who is a model of courage and determination. The direct and wholly sincere dialogue which establishes itself between these two beings, who veer between hypersensitivity and self-control, is explored through the rich family archives: short films shot in super 8 (filmed by the director’s father, but also by the filmmaker himself when we was just a small boy), footage of Riethauser and his grandmother (“Madame”) and slides and photographs of the family. 

Riethauser uses this film to give meaning to a particular aspect of his past which isn’t always linear or glorious. His current status as a director and spokesperson for the LGBT cause comes out of the suffering he has had to endure in the past. He felt obliged for a very long time to conform to a patriarchal, bourgeois version of society dominated by alpha males— a standardized version of “masculinity” which is both gruesome and ludicrous. Men, as described by the director’s father, should “have balls”, be courageous, fight for their family and their country.

Through his film, Riethauser not only paints a picture of the strong bond he shared with his grandmother but crucially, he also explores the patriarchal and bourgeois society within which genders must be interpreted and performed by being extremely careful not to upset the status quo. The young Stéphane ended up creating his own alter ego called “Riton”, a façade of pure arrogance and machismo behind which he could hide and self-annihilate. In ways such as this, the clichés surrounding gender are revealed. The director converses with the affluent, grandiose and complicated character of his grandmother, but he also voices his own inner dialogue, looking for traces of the “self” hidden beneath the hiding that he had to do as a result of a past governed by bourgeois respectability. 

Riethauser’s examination of his past and of his family is sincere and filled with humor. The power of this documentary is in the balance between intimacy and meticulousness, between the humor and the tragedy that is inherent to a reality based on appearances. He tells us at the beginning of the movie that the medium of film lets him express all those things that he was unable to say about love and sex during his childhood and adolescence. It’s his best way for taking a dispassionate and ironic look at how things used to be and gives him a liberated voice to a past that was dominated by “things unsaid”.The story of the relationship between the director and his grandmother relationship is the main crux of this documentary.

His grandmother, the matriarch of the family, was always a major influence in his life right from an early age.  She was a fiercely independent self-made woman who finally escaped the tyranny of her father who pushed her into marriage at 16 and that of her thug of a first husband.  Now 94 years old, she openly discusses her bad luck with men and with not a sign of bitterness.

The director looks back at all his personal turmoils of accepting his sexuality in a family environment where he was encouraged to be an alpha male in every sense of the world.  He uses this film to remind himself of how rough that  journey  was and  how after he finally accepts it himself, he can share the news with his family, and in particular, his grandmother.

The film is not just a cathartic journey for Riethauser, who as well as becoming a filmmaker is also a lawyer and gay activist, but also a glimpse into the remarkable relationship he shared with his grandmother. 

Riethauser’s facility with language makes us see sex roles in new ways: “a conception of women as mystical, helpless, and revered; men as controlling, aggressive and entitled, with shame and hate the fate of anyone who dares to move beyond the constructs.”

“THE TRIUMPH OF SODOM” (“El Triunfo de Sodoma”)— Underground Queer Cinema

“THE TRIUMPH OF SODOM” (“El Triunfo de Sodoma”)

Underground Queer Cinema

Amos Lassen

Goyo Anchou’s “The Triumph of Sodom” is thought-provoking underground queer cinema and a contemporary LGBTQ political work that combines social manifestos about gender, performance art and pornography.

The film begins with documenting demonstrations on the streets of Buenos Aires. From there we are taken to the Queer Club for a Spoken Word performance. If there is a plot, it is best explained by a feminist poet who explains to a horny straight guy, how he can become a feminist, a vegan and why he should be castrated to advance the world revolution.

The documentary was made in the margins of the Argentine audiovisual community (from which some of the creative team have been effectively blacklisted). It was produced according to the precepts of guerrilla film making and it is something of  a romantic torch song. Guerrilla film making in the Latin America origins of its practice is as an act of cultural resistance that uses production constraints as a starting point to reshape its very language.

Thus, marginality goes from limitation to facilitation. The result is always original, because the reality with which the production is confronted is always original. The originality of the film is part of its nature: rare and subversive. It is ajourney of consciousness that is filled with power.

“YO, ADOLESCENTE”—- After the Suicide

“YO, ADOLESCENTE”

After the Suicide

Amos Lassen

Zabo is haunted by the suicide of his good friend and a fire in Lucas Santa Ana’s, “Yo Adolescente”. He sees death everywhere. Zabo is a regular teen in a bourgeois family whose life is routine, or so we think, at first. He spends his free time at illegal parties in an abandoned warehouse and in the high school corridors with his friends. He is bisexual and he moves between boyfriends and girlfriends not knowing how to deal with the ever-increasing emotional abyss. He writes everything he feels on his blog, “Memories of a Teenager.”

Like many other teenagers, he went to a concert with his best friend. While there two hundred people were killed in a fire. During the first hours  afterwards, information was confusing and incomplete and after it was discovered what happened that night tragedy occupied everyone’s mind, so much so that Zabo didn’t find out about his friend Pol’s suicide until several days later.

Both events occurred the summer in which he turned 16 and Zabo, saw his adolescence unravel at the same time that he was prevented from exercising the last strands of freedom that he had left, before being pushed by force towards adulthood.

 

Without the support of his best friend and confidant, whose death affected him much more than he allowed himself to accept for the outside, he only found some relief in the blog Yo, Adolescente, where he could write about all those things that he could not to be drawn from within into the physical world. Unable to deeply understand what he feels or to put into words his loneliness, his desire and his fears are the only things that give some order to his efforts to fit into a world that is somewhat alien to him; a world that asks him to choose labels with which he does not quite fit.

“Yo Adolescente” is a story of loneliness while among others.  The narration goes through moments of greater solidity and clarity but there are other moments where it blurs or loses its rhythm, deviating into deepening details.

For director Lucas Santa Ana it was less important to tell a story in the traditional sense of the term, preferring to explore Zabo’s to expose a topic that seems to be forbidden to talk about like depression and depression. teen suicide.

Adolescence is a time of life that is usually approached in the cinema from a more adult position, behind a filter of nostalgia that erases or softens the complexities of self-discovery, especially when the answer is not something that easily fits what is expected. “Yo, Adolescente” gives us a stark and honest look at those years, focusing on a character who finds it particularly difficult to get along with what he wants to be and what he is expected to be, and with no one to talk about it with.

“ISAAC”— Challenges of Family

“ISAAC”

Challenges of Family

Amos Lassen

Ángeles Hernández’s “Isaac” is the story ofNacho and Denis  who meet again after sixteen years of not being in touch, and neither of them is who they used to be. They both have wives. Nacho and Martha are a perfect bourgeois married couple with good jobs, but they are not happy because Martha is unable to get pregnant. Denis and Carmen lead a more laid-back lifestyle, but live paycheck to paycheck and try to get enough money to open up a restaurant.


Denis offers his partner to be Nacho and Martha’s surrogate in exchange for the money they need to open the restaurant. Now both the two couples have to deal with secrets that were buried deeply inside Nacho and Dennis’ closet.

The film deals with the challenges of family and desire to have children while also exploring the complexities of the human condition and the forces that shape peoples’ lives. “It is about the hope for a society that no longer responds to the toxic system of values that has resulted from hegemonic masculinity.

Even though ‘Isaac’ has a layer of an LGBT film, it’s not an LGBT film, it’s an unconventional romance that doesn’t go where we think it will.

“BARE”— Eleven Naked Men Dancing

“BARE”

Eleven Naked Men Dancing

Amos Lassen

The documentary “Bare” is a celebration ofthe male body in all its complexity, might, and vulnerability. It chronicles the preparations for Belgian choreographer Thierry Smits’ provocative dance piece “Anima Ardens” (Burning Soul”) which features 11 male dancers, all of whom appear completely nude for the duration of the performance. The film features men of all shapes, heights, builds, and penis sizes. The dancers bounce, jump, roll, and wiggle around the pristine white backdrop and stage.

Director Aleksandr M. Vinogradov begins with auditions bringing us a unique dynamic that transforms as the film progresses. We see Smits asking his prospective dancers if they have read the performance description in full and understand that the piece is to be done in the nude. Several dancers are visibly surprised and uncomfortable as they begin crossing their fully clothed legs as Smits makes clear that he is choosing men based on their dancing ability and the audition scenes are a challenge as the top dancers distinguish themselves through technique, form, and confidence.

 The dancers must abandon all sense of squeamishness and prudishness. The choreography directly confronts notions of masculinity and sexuality as it brings men together to create a uniquely homosocial space in which the dancers writhe on the floor or connect their bodies to create pyramids of strength. Notions of queerness and masculinity are torn away as the dance numbers have the men explore one another’s bodies, riding them of all insecurity about brushing a colleague’s genitalia in the service of art.

We see images of birth and renewal as the dancers crawl between the bodies of other dancers. Smits implores the dancers to loosen up and discover new energy as two men merge to form a birth canal through which a third dancer wiggles and emerges. The dancers scream, moan, and squat as they use their bodies to evoke the physical feat of child labor.

There are scenes of the dance troupe between excerpts of the performances that are as revealing as the dance sequences with their deconstruction of masculinity and gender norms. From the auditions to the final performance, we are present atthe ends of insecurity as some dancers take time to emerge from their shells. As the rehearsals move toward opening night, the men become looser on stage and open up with each other. 

The excerpts of “Animus Ardens” come across as a series of aimless compositions. Even the dancers complain to Smits that the piece lacks narrative coherence. The film explores the tensions within the troupe and the personal explorations of the self each that dancer goes through as he opens himself to the world. Ideas of masculinity, gender, and sexuality, create something new and exciting.

Aleksandr Vinogradov attempts to free the male form, as well as abstract it. The film is political in the depiction of a world “overrun by right-wing and neoliberal” ideals, conflating the unabashed nudity with leftism. The claims of freedom do have weight. It is provocative yet at times it is boring once the initial shock is over. Re-contextualizing this imagery through manhood is the closest the nude dancing comes to provocative and we never know if that’s what the film is trying to show.

The dance sequences are beautifully shot, fluid, and a contrast to a blank backdrop. The white walls stand out from the stage. The close-ups of skin reinforce a vulnerability as if the film is trying to reinforce masculinity rather than separate men from gendered traits.

The penis is on screen constantly, moving independently of the dancer’s body, almost like its own character. Even the most sex-positive viewer may struggle to engage with a film that so heavily draws the eye here and that stops challenging how long we can look at the exposed body.

 Historic First 24/7 Live Queer Female TV Channel Premieres Globally Oct. 29th

 Historic First 24/7 Live Queer Female TV Channel Premieres Globally Oct. 29th

 

This femxle/womxn community includes lesbian, bi, trans female, gender non-binary, queer, etc…who have never had a committed live 24/7 TV channel for them ever before, especially globally – what an important announcement and impact!  Also, female women of color founders of the channel/network are available for interviews plus Exclusives.

 

 

The First 24/7 Queer Womxn TV Channel Premieres with OML on Revry 

 

Popular Femxle-Focused YouTube Channel Launches As Free Live TV Channel on the Revry Networks

Watch Promo
Oct. 29th, 2020 (Los Angeles) – Revry, the first global LGBTQ+ virtual cable TV network, today unveiled the newest addition to its lineup of free linear TV channels with OML on Revry –the first 24/7 live TV channel exclusively catering to queer womxn (lesbian, bi, trans female, gender non-binary, queer, etc.). This announcement adds to Revry’s suite of boundary-defying queer entertainment on its apps and FAST channels (“Free Ad Supported TV”)–available for free globally to over 250+ million households and devices in over 130 countries.

The OML on Revry channel furthers Revry’s mission of 360 degree LGBTQ+ representation by highlighing queer female or femxle stories in a truly “always on” environment and free of charge. This unprecedented move expands on the company’s early 2020 unveiling of its new queer-focused live, multi-channel platform–a niche twist on the growing emergence of free virtual cable TV networks such as Pluto TV, Peacock, and XUMO. Initially launching with four FAST channels– including Revry News (the first queer news network)–Revry has expanded with today’s announcement of OML on Revry, the company’s first 3rd party FAST channel to live exclusively in Revy’s virtual cable TV ecosphere.

 

“I’m incredibly proud of the brand we’ve built and the relationships we’ve cultivated with the LGBTQ+ community for the last decade,” shares OML founder, Shirin Etessam. “What started as a portal to curate and share quality lesbian video content has become a powerful platform to launch, stream, distribute and promote some of the very best LBTQ+ content online. We are thrilled about our partnership with Revry as its multifaceted global platform will allow us to reach a greater audience and to make Femxle-driven LBTQ+ content accessible to an even broader audience. Truly a win-win-win for all of us: Revry, OML, and our community.”

Established in 2009, OML (formerly “One More Lesbian”), began with a simple mission: to become a hub for lesbian members of the LGBTQ+ community seeking visual representation in the media and to allow access to the extremely hard to find content on one platform. By 2020, OML has amassed millions of visitors to its platform and proud to serve over a half million YouTube subscribers, curating not only lesbian content, but quality content for a broader queer audience, inclusive of all female and gender-expansive viewers.

 

“Creating a ‘radically inclusive’ global network has always been in our DNA given the makeup of our women-led, majority queer and POC founding team,” said LaShawn McGhee, Revry’s veteran and lesbian-identifying Chief Product Officer and Co-Founder. “This new queer womxn-focused partnership with OML–a tentpole brand for the lesbian and queer female communities–is an exciting expansion of our mission to meaningfully create a place of belonging for everyone in our community. I’m overjoyed to offer a free, living and breathing space for queer female stories to be seen across the world. And launching the first queer female live TV channel is just the beginning–we’re excited to explore a long-lasting future with OML.”

 

OML on Revry launches with the brand new Original Series: the hysterical “socially distant” comedy, Dating ‘In’ Place–a series that follows two young women dating and falling in love during a global pandemic. Other popular launch titles for the OML on Revry channel will include: Crazy Bitches, staring Candis Cayne, Guinevere Turner and Cathy Debuono; the paranormal sci-fi drama, Passage, staring Nicole Pacent and Shannan Leigh Reeve; all three seasons of Gal Pals, the series dubbed as The L Word for the Broad Citygeneration and Girls Like Magic, directed by Eastsiders’ Kit Williamson.

 

OML on Revry (watch.revry.tv/OML) will launch October 29, 2020. Dating ‘In’ Place premieres November 1, 2020.

ABOUT REVRY

 

Watch Queer TV 24/7 with the first LGBTQ+ virtual cable TV network. Revry offers free live TV channels and on-demand viewing of its global library featuring LGBTQ+ movies, shows, music, podcasts, news, and exclusive originals all in one place! Revry is currently available globally in over 250+ million households and devices and on seven OTT, mobile, and Desktop platforms. Revry can also be viewed on nine live and on-demand channels and Connected TVs including: The Roku Channel, Samsung TV Plus, Comcast Xfinity X1, Dell, XUMO TV, Zapping TV, STIRR, TiVo+, and as the first LGBTQ+ virtual reality channel on Littlstar (available on PlayStation devices). The company–an inaugural member of the Goldman Sachs Black and LatinX Cohort–is headquartered in Los Angeles and led by a diverse founding team who bring decades of experience in the fields of tech, digital media, and LGBTQ+ advocacy. Follow on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram @revrytv, Revry.tv

“The Stonewall Generation: LGBTQ Elders on Sex, Activism, and Aging” by Jane Fleishman— Nine Elders

Fleishman, Jane. “The Stonewall Generation: LGBTQ Elders on Sex, Activism, and Aging”, Skinner House Books, 2020.

Nine Elders

Amos Lassen

Jane Fleishman’s “The Stonewall Generation: LGBTQ Elders on Sex, Activism, and Aging”, is a collection pf stories of nine elders in the LGBTQ community who came of age around the time of Stonewall. Through candid interviews, they share their loves and sexual liberation in “the context of the political movements of the 1960s, 1970s, and today.” Each of these has spent a lifetime fighting for our community and our liberation and our “right to live, love, and be free.” Of course this came with a price and that includes the  challenges that they faced about their sexual orientation, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, politics, disabilities, kinkiness, nonmonogamy, and other identities. 

Here are the struggles within the LGBTQ community:  not all problems came from outside. Here are stories of those whose lives were changed forever by Stonewall and who, also,  became agents of change themselves. These are stories that must be told and passed on from generation to generation.  This is so especially true now as we face what this country is going through now. We could, quite possibly, lose all of our gains. The stories are beautiful and often heartbreaking but THEY ARE our stories.

Fleishman provides commentary and historical notes making this a text of great importance.  We stand on the shoulders of those who came before and while I am a member of the elder generation, I never allow myself to lose sight ow how we got to where we are.

Reading the stories of the people who were there is something we cannot allow ourselves to ignore for to do is to ignore our own history and heritage.

“2 COOL 2 BE 4GOTTEN”— Felix and The Brothers

“2 COOL 2 BE 4GOTTEN”

Felix and The Brothers

Amos Lassen

Petersen Vargas’s “2 Cool 2 Be Forgotten” is the story of Felix Salonga (Khalil Ramos), a friendless teenager from a poor background who is determined to be the best in his class and elevate his status. Handsome and mysterious Magnus and Maxim Snyder (Ethan Salvador and Jameson Blake), half-American brothers, want to escape life from the Philippines and live in the USA. As Felix develops a relationship with the brothers and discovers desires that lead to dangerous consequences.

This is a coming of age movie set in Pampanga in the Philippines and follows the life of Felix, whose existence is shaken to its core when Magnus and Maximillian start going to his school.
Felix is especiallydrawn to Magnus, befriends him and infiltrates the private lives of the Snyder brothers. He interweaves himself to their dark and mysterious motives and at the same time, his interactions with them uncover desires within him that he has never confronted before.

The action takes place ten years after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. Felix is upset about his poor living conditions and finds solace in a journal-writing exercise for his English class.
 At first, his journal is filled with cynical observations against his teachers and classmates. But when the Snyder brothers transfer to his school, he finds himself gravitating toward their mysterious personalities.

His interactions with them bring to the fore his new desires but then he learns that their lives  aren’t as glamorous as people think. Things spiral out of control when a sinister plot to murder the mother of the Snyder brother arises, leaving death and devastation all along its path.